How to Repair Pet Damaged Walls

Thank you for sharing!Pin on PinterestShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+Share on StumbleUpon

Ask Tim Post: from Marty's Musings

Today’s Ask Tim question is from our friend Kim:

Can you tell me how to repair pet damaged walls?

How to Repair Pet Damaged Walls by Marty's Musings

image source

HEY KIM! Usually animal scratches are pretty localized and, therefore, easy to fix.

Spackle

Take a course sanding block (or sandpaper) and go over the damage just to get rid of any high spots and debris.  Do a quick pass with spackle, just to fill in the holes a bit and let dry (or use a hair dryer if you want to speed this whole thing up).  Try to keep your spackle smooth with this, and each subsequent, layer – you may need to make three passes, enlarging the area just a bit each time.  A cereal-sized spot may end up the size of a framed picture, or more. 

Sand

When it comes to sanding, I use a wet wallpaper sponge, but most people will grab that sandpaper again.  I just don’t like the dust.  Smooth to your satisfaction.

Prime and Paint

You can prime if you want with an aerosol Kilz or Zinser product, but protect the floor from over-spray. The final step is painting.

I’m assuming we’re talking about sheet rock here.  If you have paneling or something else, you can still do it this way, but you need to do it with a little more finesse.  Wallpaper will be almost impossible to repair, but I figured we weren’t going there!

Hope that helps!
Tim

Keep those questions coming! Leave a comment here or on my facebook page.

Check out my husband’s answers about textured ceiling removal, tile and grout repair, painting fabric furniture and what to do with peeling wallpaper. He’s a keeper!

Thank you for sharing!Pin on PinterestShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+Share on StumbleUpon

Comments

  1. Janet says:

    Hey Marty and TIM, Tim this is probably more up your alley than Marty!s. We’re replacing original 1962 cabinets that did not go to the ceiling with new ones that do. Also the over the stove-range exhaust hood, not vented. The new cabinet over the fridge is also to the ceiling. Because we’ve gone to a 30″ range from the original 36″, we have a 30″ range hood as well. So there will be a gap. All over blog-land have been pull-out, single can wide tall cabinets and the plan is to do that, at least to the fridge height then maybe just a faux-filler. Sounds straight forward but things never go that way, way. Over the fridge and range cabinets have been removed and the wall is intact, good conditon. Tips?
    Janet & Carl

Speak Your Mind

*

Subscribe here and get FREE updates!

Subscribe to my posts and practical tips and get my FREE guide "5 Easy Ways to Decorate Your Home for Practically Nothing!"

Your email address is 100% confidential and safe with me!