Home » DIY » How to Install Beadboard Paneling

How to Install Beadboard Paneling

This post may contain affiliate links which won't change your price but will share some commission.

Step by step DIY tutorial on installing beadboard paneling in a bathroom, including tips and tricks on using a template, painting and finish work.

A sign on the corner of a room 

When Tim and I started talking about our bathroom problems (leak behind the shower kit, ugly tile walls and inefficient use of space) we knew we wanted a different look than what we’ve lived with for 22 years now.

We literally spent hours upon hours tossing ideas back and forth, estimating products and measuring the space.

In the bathroom reveal I showed you how thrilled I was that everything came together beautifully.

I first showed you the amazing shower makeover, both part one and part two.

Next up on the list of projects to share is how to install beadboard paneling.

I’ll start with the ugly before. Don’t you just love the green sponge painting on the walls?

Good grief, could it be more dated? And that lovely “security light” or whatever it’s called? 

If the power goes out, I’ll certainly remember to press this big white plastic circle , although it won’t come on because the batteries will be dead!

A sink and a mirror

Do you see this lovely tile? It was 3/4 of the way up the wall over the entire bathroom. If I remember correctly, it contained gold specks in it 22 years ago when we moved in.

Even covered with white paint it was truly ugly.

I’ll turn over the details to my DIY hubby.

A sink and a mirror

How to Install Beadboard Paneling

Steps for installing beadboard paneling:

  1. Remove and replace sheetrock as needed.
  2. Mark the studs with painter’s tape and a marker.
  3. Make a template.
  4. Cut out template with a jig saw.
  5. Glue to sub-surface with Liquid Nails adhesive and then nail.
  6. Caulk where necessary and paint.

From Tim: Usually every construction project begins with de-construction of some sort.  In our little hovel’s bathroom, the mosaic tile simply had to go.  

I knew from other projects that this would come at the cost of the sheetrock underneath, so rather than deal with an entire room filled with repair work, we decided that leveling and covering was a better option.  And the answer was beadboard!

A hotel room with a sink and a mirror

See what I mean about repair?  YIKES!  This was intimidating, but it gets even worse…

A sink sitting under a window

Step 1. Remove and replace sheetrock as needed.

Not only did the tile come down but most of the sheet rock as well.  There was both electrical and plumbing work to be done behind it all so almost everything you see here was removed and replaced.

A room with a sink and a mirror

SO many transitions here!  Coming out of the tub surround was the Durock (cement board), then new sheet rock running into existing sheet rock.  

The concern was to maintain everything at the same level – 1/2″ thickness in preparation for the beadboard.  Not looking for perfection, just level.

A close up of a door

Step 2: Mark the studs with painter’s tape and a marker.

A good idea, even before this point, is to mark the studs in some way on the floor and/or ceiling so you know where the solid points are.  I used painter’s tape and a marker.  

Even though the beadboard would be glued and sparsely nailed, I still wanted to hit those studs as much as possible.

A close up of a piece of paper

Again, not pretty, just level.

Wall and Bathroom

The electrical is new, a GFCI and a three-way switch for the new ventilation fan/light combo (with the existing light above the vanity).  These were additional obstacles to consider when cutting the beadboard…but I had a solution…

Bead and Wall

Step 3. Make a template.

A template!  Beadboard comes in 4′ x 8′ sheets, so we made a replica out of brown construction paper that comes on a roll.  The template was held up on the wall and all those things we knew we had to cut around were easy to find; pipes, electrical and even the big hole for the medicine cabinet!

 There is NO wiggle room when using beadboard, especially when running it from the floor to the ceiling.  Everything had to be in exactly the right place or the $32/sheet beadboard was toast.  

Step 4. Cut out template with a jig saw.

The template was genius!  After marking and cutting out the holes, those were transferred to the sheet of beadboard with a marker and then everything was cut out with a jig saw.

How to Install a Beadboard Wall from Marty's Musings-10

Ah, the obligatory pause in the project for the camera…

How to Install a Beadboard Wall from Marty's Musings-11

And here is the perfect fit!  

Step 5: Glue to sub-surface with Liquid Nails adhesive and then nail.

Each piece was glued to the sub-surface with Liquid Nails construction adhesive and then nailed along the top, bottom and corner where I knew the trim work would hide the nails.  In the entire bathroom, I only had 4 partial seams that were not in corners, since the tile coming out of the tub surround ran right to the beadboard.

How to Install a Beadboard Wall from Marty's Musings-12

Glued, nailed, and moving on.  You can see what I mean about those cutouts needing to be exact.  No wiggle room…

How to Install a Beadboard Wall from Marty's Musings-13

Step 6: Caulk where necessary and paint.

These seams would either be covered or lightly caulked; crown molding at the top, corner molding and then baseboard at the bottom.  Everything got a coat of paint to finish it off.

How to Install a Beadboard Wall-14

It is astonishing how these long, vertical lines make the little bath seem bigger.  I’m glad we decided not to stop it with a chair railing.

A close up of a door

 Some finishing touches and ready to move to tiling!

How to Install a Beadboard Wall from Marty's Musings-16

From Marty: My husband does such a great job of making everything look easy! In case you’re wondering, the entire bathroom remodel took about 6 weeks, working almost every day. 

Smal Bathroom Remodel from Marty's Muisngs

It was totally worth it! Every little detail was planned, down to the rustic jars, coral accents and blue baskets.

How to Install Beadboard Paneling from Marty's Musings

I love the way the beadboard makes this tiny bathroom feel so much larger. It’s a fabulous clean look for us. 

How to Install Beadboard Paneling from Marty's Musings

READ ALL THE POSTS IN OUR SMALL BATHROOM REMODEL:

Similar Posts

61 Comments

  1. Pingback: Doug Pitassi
  2. Pingback: Portland SEO Pros
  3. Hey, I love the bead board idea, and it looks great! We were considering it for our remodel over previously tiled walls in our main bathroom, but when we went browsing home improvement stores, I am saw that it is not recommended for high-moisture areas. Is there a particular way you worked around that with a certain paint and/or primer?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.